Play Slots at Royal Ace Casino





It is expected to see the campaign at all six games of the first division soccer teams, where the values ​of respect, love, and tolerance will be promoted.
- Institute of Sports photo -


USA AID funds campaign against racism












Published Monday, March 22, 2021

By A.M. Costa Rica staff

With a powerful message "Respect, No Racism" that will be displayed on banners in soccer stadiums as well as on the player's t-shirts, the campaign launched to fight racism in the country.

The campaign is promoted by the Vice President of the Republic, Epsy Campbell and financed by the United States Agency for International Development, USAID, in union with two other international organizations, the United Nations Population Fund and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO.

The campaign, which is usually carried out in September for the Day of the Black Person and Afro-Costa Rican Culture, was moved up to match with the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on Sunday.

It is expected to see the campaign at all six games of the first division soccer teams, where the values ​of respect, love, and tolerance will be promoted.

"We want to reinforce the message to eradicate all forms of racism and racial discrimination present not only in sport but in our society," Vice President Campbell said. "Today young people from all over the world embrace the life of Afro-descendants and launch a desperate call for equality, love and respect because they consider that enough was enough, racism and discrimination cannot be tolerated."

As part of the actions for this movement, all the organizations involved will continue promoting spaces free of all forms of racial discrimination, as well as approaching actions that allow progress towards an inclusive country, the government said in its statement.



According to Keyner Brown, one of the top players in the country, the use of the shirt "sends a message to the whole country, but especially to boys and girls, so that they can grow up with an image of inclusion and respect. "I hope this small action helps put a stop to racist and discriminatory comments," he said.

The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on the day the police in Sharpeville, South Africa, opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration against apartheid "pass laws" in 1960.

In 1979, the General Assembly adopted a program of activities to be undertaken during the second half of the Decade for Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination.
 
On that occasion, the United Nations General Assembly decided that a week of solidarity with the peoples struggling against racism and racial discrimination, beginning on 21 March, would be organized annually in all States.

Since then, the apartheid system in South Africa has been dismantled. Racist laws and practices have been abolished in many countries, the United Nations said in its statement. "Yet still, in all regions, too many individuals, communities and societies suffer from the injustice and stigma that racism brings," they said.

--------------------------
What else can be done to put an end to racism? We would like to know your thoughts on this story. Send your comments to news@amcostarica.com







Facebook110217.jpg twitter110217.jpg
Subscribe110217.jpg