Sports News Lifestyle & Culture
Food & Good Eating
Real Estate Sales
Real Estate Rentals
Calendar
Tourism & Things To Do Hotel's Directory About Us
Professional's Directory Classified Ads

         











Play Slots at Royal Ace Casino





Usually, during or after the holidays, health problems happen that could have been prevented by continuing to take the proper medications.
 - A.M. Costa Rica illustrative photo -


Avoid medical emergencies during the Easter vacation,
specialists advise





















Published Tuesday, March 30, 2021

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Social Security specialists recommend that people who travel to the beach or countryside during the Easter break, take precautions to avoid medical emergencies.

During travel, people should avoid medical problems by continuing their treatments. In the list of supplies to travel people should include their medications, specialists say.

Usually, during or after the holidays, health problems happen that could have been prevented by continuing to take the proper medications.

"Discontinuing medications can have negative consequences on the health of chronic patients such as hypertensive, diabetic or immunosuppressed people, among others," Viviana Ramos, director of the National Center for Poison Control said.

"The disruption of routine happens when we go on vacations and patients forget the medicines or even double the doses of their treatments," Ramos said.



Follow these tips to avoid medical emergencies during vacation:

• Medications that require cooling such as insulin can be transported inside an ice storage container.

• For medications that do not require refrigeration, make sure they are in a place with low humidity, away from sunlight and an environment below 86 degree Fahrenheit.

• Protect yourself from the sun at all times to avoid sun burns by wearing a hat, wearing cool clothing and lathering sunscreen.

• If you want to be in the sun, the safest time to do it is before 10 a.m and after 2 p.m.
If possible, take the one daily dose medications at night to reduce the effect of the sunlight.

People can request the specific medications precautionary measures to the specialists of the National Poison Control Center at line 800-4686-9422. Experts will respond to questions (in the Spanish language) 24/7, Social Security said.

-----------------------------
Have you heard of expats who got poisoned from taking medication while on vacation?
We would like to know your thoughts on this story. Send your comments to news@amcostarica.com


Professional's services and business
ProfessionalsTopAd010819.jpg


Nonprofit organizations




Shipping Services






U.S. Income Tax & Accounting







Real Estate Agents
...





















TimeShare Services







Car Rental Service







Matchmaking Services






Laboratory and Medical Services
 











Business Consulting Services
















Academy Sports









Facebook110217.jpg twitter110217.jpg
Subscribe110217.jpg