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Intending to avoid the loss of livestock, the Panthera Corporation, a world leader in the conservation of wild cats, helped farmers to genetically
improve their livestock and not focus on the wildcats hunting.  - A.M. Costa Rica illustrative photo -

Farmers genetically improve their cattle
in exchange for avoiding wildcat attacks















Published Monday, April 19, 2021

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The highest number of attacks by wildcats, such as jaguars, on livestock was recorded four years ago, reaching up to 16 animals killed in Lomas de Sierpe, in Colorado de Pococi Canton, Limón Province.

Intending to avoid the loss of livestock, the Panthera Corporation, a world leader in the conservation of wild cats, helped farmers to genetically improve their livestock and not focus on the wildcats hunting.

Panthera developed the plan for a livestock genetic improvement with a budget of more than $8,000 that was granted by the “Rural Impulse” plan of the Rural Development Institute.

"The Panthera Corporation was one of the 61 organizations that in 2020 received the aid from the Rural Impulse program to develop innovative ideas to face the effects of the covid-19 pandemic," Harys Regidor, president of the institute said. "This particular project allows us to understand how conservation can go hand in hand with productive activities."

The corporation's project was developed by the biologist Daniel Corrales, who bought specialized equipment and genetic material to develop an artificial insemination system.




With an improvement in the insemination of cattle, the aim is to increase the number of animal births. To later keep the cattle in more protected areas avoiding more wildcat attacks.

In addition to the corporation, the organization Ganaderos Unidos, also received financing to buy pasture packing machines and more genetic material for the insemination plan.

The packed pasture is kept in farmers' barns to feed livestock during periods of food shortages, the institute said.

The livestock genetic improvement project benefits 20 farmers in the Pococi area, the institute said.


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What have you heard of farmers hunting wild animals to protect their livestock in your community? We would like to know your thoughts on this story. Send your comments to news@amcostarica.com







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